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Erik Spoelstra Bio Erik Spoelstra Erik Celino Spoelstra (born November 1, 1970 in Evanston, Illinois) is a Filipino-American basketball coach. He is currently the head coach of the NBA's Miami Heat. He is the...

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Miami Heat to stick with small ball Miami Heat to stick with small ball, including Danny Granger getting time at the four LeBron James is gone but the Miami Heat are still going to play the Miami Heat system - go small, pressure the ball,...

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Miami Heat start process of a new season Miami Heat start process of a new season MIAMI (AP) - Erik Spoelstra has ready plenty about the notion of reinvention, which seems appropriate given the task that he and the Miami Heat are embarking...

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Mario Chalmers offers words of wisdom for LeBron James'... Mario Chalmers offers words of wisdom for LeBron James' new supporting cast It's not surprising to hear Mario Chalmers tell Bleacher Report's Ethan Skolnick, "We all just took too much of a back seat...

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Alonzo Mourning is a Hall of Famer Alonzo Mourning is a Hall of Famer It was supposed to be Alonzo Mourning’s year. It was the summer of 2000, and Michael Jordan had long since gone away. The Knicks had traded Patrick Ewing, and...

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WHY DWADE ACCCEPTED $10 MILLION LESS WHY DWADE ACCCEPTED $10 MILLION LESS Why would he opt out of two years and $41.8 million, only to return at two years for roughly $10 million less? That's a question that, as he joked Friday, his...

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Erik Spoelstra Bio

Category : Erik Spoelstra

Erik Spoelstra

Erik Celino Spoelstra (born November 1, 1970 in Evanston, Illinois) is a Filipino-American basketball coach. He is currently the head coach of the NBA’s Miami Heat.

He is the first Filipino-American head coach in the NBA, as well as the first Filipino-American head coach of any North American professional sports team.

From 2001 to 2008, he served as Assistant Coach/Director of Scouting for the team. He coached the Heat to 90 wins and two playoff runs in his two years as coach.

His father, Jon Spoelstra, was an NBA Executive for the Portland Trail Blazers, Denver Nuggets, Buffalo Braves and New Jersey Nets. His mother, Elisa Celino is from San Pablo, Laguna in the Philippines.

Spoelstra grew up in Portland, Oregon, where he graduated from Jesuit High School in 1988 and from the University of Portland in 1992. At Jesuit High School, Spoelstra is third all-time in assists (488), tied for third in three-pointers made (156) and sixth in both three-point percentage (.384) and free throw percentage (.824).

At the University of Portland, Spoelstra was the Pilots’ starting point guard for four years, averaging 9.2 points, 4.4 assists and 2.4 rebounds per game, and was named the West Coast Conference Freshman of the Year. He is a member of Portland’s 1,000-point club.

After graduation from college, he spent two years as a player/coach for TuS Herten (later the Herten Ruhr Devils), a German professional team.

Spoelstra joined the Heat staff in 1995 as the team’s video coordinator. After two years, he was named assistant coach/video coordinator, then promoted to assistant coach/advance scout in 1999. He became the assistant coach/director of scouting in 2001.

He was cited by Sports Illustrated (May 30, 2005) for honing star guard Dwyane Wade’s “shooting balance and smoothing out his release after the Flash’s return from the Athens Olympics.”

In April 2008, Spoelstra was named successor to Pat Riley as head coach of the Miami Heat.

In naming Spoelstra as head coach, Riley said:  “This game is now about younger coaches who are technologically skilled, innovative and bring fresh new ideas. That’s what we feel we are getting with Erik Spoelstra. He’s a man that was born to coach.”

Pat Riley plans to change his approach from when Stan Van Gundy was the coach.

Riley predicted:  “A lot of players want the discipline; they will play [hard] for Spoelstra, because they respect him.'”

Follow Erik Spoelstra and The Miami Heat Fan Page at Facebook

Wikipedia

Miami Heat to stick with small ball

Category : Miami Heat

Miami Heat to stick with small ball, including Danny Granger getting time at the four

LeBron James is gone but the Miami Heat are still going to play the Miami Heat system – go small, pressure the ball, run, space the floor and move the ball.

They have the guys to do it considering they will start Chris Bosh at center, Josh McRoberts at power forward and Luol Deng at the three (with Dwyane Wade and Mario Chalmers in the backcourt).

How committed to the system are they? How about some Danny Granger at the four. That’s going to happen, reports Ira Winderman at the Sun-Sentinel.

If Chris Bosh and Josh McRoberts are your starting power players, and with Pat Riley already talking about Granger getting time in the power rotation, (playing small ball) again appears to be the direction.

And it’s not as if there is much of a Plan B, with Chris Andersen at an age where limited minutes are the preferred approach, and with Udonis Haslem having been marginalized in recent seasons.

Bosh was pushed to the side and really made sacrifices in his game to make the LeBron big three work, I expect him to return to much bigger numbers and have a good season. I think all of the Heat starters up front will have good statistical seasons.

But Granger at the four… we’ll see. After seeing him with the Clippers at the end of last season I’m not sure how many minutes he can really give at this point. He’ll be okay when out there, but he just seemed limited.

I think the small ball is going to work for Miami during the regular season, they have good talent on that roster. They are going to win more than 45 games and be in that crowded second tier in the East, likely finishing fourth through sixth in the standings.

But I think you can beat that style come the playoffs. It worked for them the last couple years because LeBron James is the ultimate trump card, but Spoelstra can’t play that hand this year and any team with size can be a real problem for them.

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Kurt Helin

Miami Heat start process of a new season

Category : Miami Heat

Miami Heat start process of a new season

MIAMI (AP) – Erik Spoelstra has ready plenty about the notion of reinvention, which seems appropriate given the task that he and the Miami Heat are embarking upon.

The post-LeBron James chapter of Heat basketball is beginning.

Spoelstra, the coach entering his seventh season in Miami, somehow sees it as opportunity.

Spoelstra and the Heat went through media day on Friday, the annual prelude to the start of training camp. For the first time in five years, Miami will begin a season without being widely expected to end the season as NBA champions, an obvious side effect of James returning to Cleveland and leaving the Heat.

”We have a much different challenge,” Spoelstra said. ”I can’t believe this, but I’m starting my 20th year here. And we’ve had many different chapters and different challenges. If I’ve learned anything in this seat, I’ve learned that’s what coaching in this NBA business is about, is embracing change, adapting with change.”

And there are changes. Plenty of them.

It’s not like James is the only departure from the team that lost in last year’s NBA Finals. The Heat had 18 players in uniform at various points of last season; only seven of them are back in uniform for the start of this training camp.

Miami has 51 percent of its scoring from last season back; by comparison, San Antonio – which needed five games to oust Miami as NBA champions – has 99 percent of last year’s scoring returning this year.

”I might have to start passing out nametags and stickers,” Heat forward Udonis Haslem said.

”I thought I’d seen everything in this league. This is my first year experiencing something like this, with 11 new guys. Weird? No. But interesting. … It’s definitely different.”

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TIM REYNOLDS

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