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Erik Spoelstra Bio Erik Spoelstra Erik Celino Spoelstra (born November 1, 1970 in Evanston, Illinois) is a Filipino-American basketball coach. He is currently the head coach of the NBA's Miami Heat. He is the...

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Mario Chalmers offers words of wisdom for LeBron James'... Mario Chalmers offers words of wisdom for LeBron James' new supporting cast It's not surprising to hear Mario Chalmers tell Bleacher Report's Ethan Skolnick, "We all just took too much of a back seat...

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Alonzo Mourning is a Hall of Famer Alonzo Mourning is a Hall of Famer It was supposed to be Alonzo Mourning’s year. It was the summer of 2000, and Michael Jordan had long since gone away. The Knicks had traded Patrick Ewing, and...

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WHY DWADE ACCCEPTED $10 MILLION LESS WHY DWADE ACCCEPTED $10 MILLION LESS Why would he opt out of two years and $41.8 million, only to return at two years for roughly $10 million less? That's a question that, as he joked Friday, his...

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CHRIS BOSH IS THE NEW ALPHA MALE CHRIS BOSH IS THE NEW ALPHA MALE For Chris Bosh, there's a desire to prove that he can still be the primary option, a role in which he has flourished in rare opportunities (at Atlanta, at San Antonio,...

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Dwyane Wade says he 'knew' on flight back from Las... Dwyane Wade says he 'knew' on flight back from Las Vegas that LeBron James would return to Cleveland LeBron James' decision to leave the Miami Heat in free agency and return to Northeast Ohio to lead...

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Erik Spoelstra Bio

Category : Erik Spoelstra

Erik Spoelstra

Erik Celino Spoelstra (born November 1, 1970 in Evanston, Illinois) is a Filipino-American basketball coach. He is currently the head coach of the NBA’s Miami Heat.

He is the first Filipino-American head coach in the NBA, as well as the first Filipino-American head coach of any North American professional sports team.

From 2001 to 2008, he served as Assistant Coach/Director of Scouting for the team. He coached the Heat to 90 wins and two playoff runs in his two years as coach.

His father, Jon Spoelstra, was an NBA Executive for the Portland Trail Blazers, Denver Nuggets, Buffalo Braves and New Jersey Nets. His mother, Elisa Celino is from San Pablo, Laguna in the Philippines.

Spoelstra grew up in Portland, Oregon, where he graduated from Jesuit High School in 1988 and from the University of Portland in 1992. At Jesuit High School, Spoelstra is third all-time in assists (488), tied for third in three-pointers made (156) and sixth in both three-point percentage (.384) and free throw percentage (.824).

At the University of Portland, Spoelstra was the Pilots’ starting point guard for four years, averaging 9.2 points, 4.4 assists and 2.4 rebounds per game, and was named the West Coast Conference Freshman of the Year. He is a member of Portland’s 1,000-point club.

After graduation from college, he spent two years as a player/coach for TuS Herten (later the Herten Ruhr Devils), a German professional team.

Spoelstra joined the Heat staff in 1995 as the team’s video coordinator. After two years, he was named assistant coach/video coordinator, then promoted to assistant coach/advance scout in 1999. He became the assistant coach/director of scouting in 2001.

He was cited by Sports Illustrated (May 30, 2005) for honing star guard Dwyane Wade’s “shooting balance and smoothing out his release after the Flash’s return from the Athens Olympics.”

In April 2008, Spoelstra was named successor to Pat Riley as head coach of the Miami Heat.

In naming Spoelstra as head coach, Riley said:  “This game is now about younger coaches who are technologically skilled, innovative and bring fresh new ideas. That’s what we feel we are getting with Erik Spoelstra. He’s a man that was born to coach.”

Pat Riley plans to change his approach from when Stan Van Gundy was the coach.

Riley predicted:  “A lot of players want the discipline; they will play [hard] for Spoelstra, because they respect him.'”

Follow Erik Spoelstra and The Miami Heat Fan Page at Facebook

Wikipedia

Mario Chalmers offers words of wisdom for LeBron James’ new supporting cast

Category : Mario Chalmers

Mario Chalmers offers words of wisdom for LeBron James’ new supporting cast

It’s not surprising to hear Mario Chalmers tell Bleacher Report’s Ethan Skolnick, “We all just took too much of a back seat in the Finals,” since the San Antonio Spurs undressed everyone not named LeBron James and Chris Bosh in their five-game dismantling of the Miami Heat this past June.

But the mercurial point guard’s reflection on a failed three-peat offers words of warning for the Cleveland Cavaliers: Dynasties aren’t easily built and even harder to maintain.

Only Scottie Pippen remained on the roster from the first edition of the championship Chicago Bulls when Michael Jordan began his pursuit of a second three-peat in 1995. It was an even lonelier road for Kobe Bryant in the seven seasons between Lakers titles last decade.

A leading man can carry a production so far, but the show won’t go on without an adequate supporting cast, and NBA bit players only take a backseat for so long before seeking bigger roles and paychecks.

Taking the analogy a step further, the occasional Alan Arkin or Jared Leto accepts a smaller part for redemption or to stave off retirement, but they seek the spotlight again or aren’t long for the stage.

Where were we? Ah, yes, Mario Chalmers, a disastrous NBA Finals performance and the mental makeup of a role player living in the shadow of one of the game’s brightest stars.

“You know, for the first time in my career, I felt like I wasn’t … yeah, my confidence wasn’t there,” Chalmers said. “Going through that whole San Antonio series, I just felt like in the playoffs I kept getting worse and worse every round. I just couldn’t figure it out. …

“Yeah, that’s the worst thing, because you never know,” Chalmers said.

“Everybody in my ear, talking about, ‘We need you, we need you to do this, we need you to do that.’ And then when it comes to the game, I didn’t feel involved. Like, you all talk about how y’all need me, but y’all didn’t put me in position to do anything. In previous years, if I was in that position, I would make sure I would go get the ball, I would put myself in position to score. I felt like this year, we all just took too much of a back seat in the Finals. …

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Ben Rohrbach

Alonzo Mourning is a Hall of Famer

Category : Alonzo Mourning

Alonzo Mourning is a Hall of Famer

It was supposed to be Alonzo Mourning’s year.

It was the summer of 2000, and Michael Jordan had long since gone away. The Knicks had traded Patrick Ewing, and embraced a rebuilding plan of sorts. The Indiana Pacers had made the Finals the season before, but they restructured the team’s roster in the wake of Rik Smits’ retirement.

The Bucks couldn’t get their act together. Allen Iverson and Vince Carter’s teams, seemingly, were not ready to rule the Eastern Conference. The East was open for the taking.

Knowing this, Pat Riley went to work. He maneuvered on draft night to pick up shooter Eddie House, and stalwart scorer Chris Gatling. Months later, Gatling was used as an asset to acquire power forward Brian Grant in a three-way deal.

A few weeks before that, Riley sent longtime Heat forwards P.J. Brown and Jamal Mashburn to Charlotte for Eddie Jones and Anthony Mason.

These may not seem like huge moves in 2014, but during that era Grant was an emerging star, Jones was routinely on the All-Star team, and Mason ended up making his first All-Star game later that season. To top things off, Riley also re-signed franchise point man Tim Hardaway.

All would be in Miami to support the heart and soul of the franchise, the aforementioned Mr. Mourning, who was coming off of winning a gold medal in the Sydney Olympics.

Long after the published NBA season preview issues hit the stands, Mourning would take in a life-altering diagnosis. “Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis” was the call, a kidney condition that can be exacerbated by the typical NBA player’s reliance on anti-inflammatory pills.

Alonzo would be out for an indefinite amount of time, his dream season scuttled, his best chance at a ring taken away.

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Kelly Dwyer

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